Wednesday, 12 October 2016

Book 25 of 2016 is the fifth in the Lunar Chronicles, Winter by Marissa Meyer.

This is the end of the series and it was a thoroughly enjoyable. If you want the princesses to save the day then this is your series.

Four rebels out of five.

Should I read this? Yes. It is quite enjoyable and exciting!
What did I learn? The world is changing and women are now running it.

Monday, 26 September 2016


Book 24 of 2016 is the fourth in the Lunar Chronicles, Fairest by Marissa Meyer.

My least favourite of the series is one of the .5 books. Yes, authors are writing middle books conjoining major titles in the series. Fairest sits between book 3 (Cress) and book 4 (Winter).

It did make me rightfully dislike the evil queen and give insight in to her insanity but I could have gleaned this having skipped this book. Read it or not, it won't make that big a difference.

This story is of the evil queen from Snow White.

Three my-parents-made-me-an-evil-queens out of five.

Should I read this? You can read this series without touching this book. It's short so read it if you read fast. Otherwise, skip it.
What did I learn? I have a good reason for disliking middle books. It's a money making venture.

Sunday, 25 September 2016


Book 23 of 2016 is the third in the Lunar Chronicles, Cress by Marissa Meyer.

This is taken from the story of Rapunzel. When I say taken, I do mean that it starts there but goes off in the adventurous way that all the books in this series have.

The main series arc is rising to a crescendo with this third book of five. As they introduce a new character, the tension builds. I really like the characters. I like that they are not hopeless damsels in distress. I like that they fly spaceships and raid castles. I like that the prince charmings are supporting characters around these strong women.

Now I'm on to Fairest without hesitation.

Four space princesses out of five.

Should I read this? It's a fun series. I'd recommend you do.

What did I learn? Rapunzel is much more likeable than Disney would let us believe.

Monday, 5 September 2016

Ice Station

Book 22 of 2016 is Ice Station by Matthew Reilly.

I've only read one other book by this author and it was a good airport book. It is very Indiana Jones mixed with Chris Ryan. This is not the best writing you'll ever read but it is engaging.

The details around wildlife and most of the science stuff was pretty cool. The action was non-stop and so entertaining. He is worth the read.

Four marines out of five.

Should I read this? If you're in an airport and have a long flight ahead then, yes.

What did I learn? Lots about orcas.


Book 21 of 2016 is Scarlet by Marissa Meyer.

This is book two of the Lunar Chronicles. This is a series I am thoroughly enjoying and can not fault at all. This is a re-write of the classic fairy tales with a feminist and technological twist. How could I not like them? Now to read the rest.

Four princesses out of five.

Should I read this? Yes. Just do.

What did I learn? Some trilogies are different.

Sunday, 7 August 2016

Cyber Storm

Book 20 of 2016 is Cyber Storm by Matthew Mather.

Another Kindle Unlimited book that disappointed me beyond belief. Despite the 3.7 star rating on GoodReads, this book failed miserably.

The whole story is quite a good version of a technical apocalypse that is completely negated in the last couple of chapters. I was going to give this a 3.5/5 before the final play. It was shockingly bad.

One lazy ending out of five.

Should I read this? Do not read this book. Ever.

What did I learn? A bad author doesn't know how to end a story and can ruin it at summation.

Monday, 4 July 2016

The Marshmallow Test

Book 19 of 2016 is The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control by Walter Mischel.

A book based on a famous psychological experiment that anyone who has had their self-control falter has heard of.

I know the child I would have been. I'd not have taken the marshmallow because I was very obedient and knew to wait for the better option. Not sure that reflects in my current life though. My adult life.

The idea that nurture is as powerful as nature was interesting. This is something I have believed for a while but have not seen backed with a lot of studies.

The way this was written was not that interesting but the studies and interpretations were.

If there had been more tips and tricks for dealing with hot actions, that would have made this more worth the read but it wasn't.

Three marshmallows out of five.

Should I read this? Only if you have an interest in CBT and want more help with what to read more about around self-control.
What did I learn? All this talk of them made me want to eat marshmallows.

The 5th Wave

Book 18 of 2016 is The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey.

This book has been on list of books to read since 2014. It was actually in my top ten reads and kept getting pushed down the list by other books because I always knew I'd read it one day. It only took two years to get there.

This is another Young Adult book, which is I genre I enjoy for the adventure and very easy reading.

This is another post apocalyptic tale with a strong female lead with a mission that will not be taken from her.

This is another sit down and read in two days book.

The main character Cassie is believable and likeable. There are moments when she says something very teenage girl and then snaps herself out of it. This gave truly gives away the fact that a man wrote her and not a woman. I say this because women can have multiple trains of thought going simultaneously without so deliberately halting a thought as silly and starting a new one. That other way is a very male way of thinking.

Through this book, all the major characters are fighting to save someone more innocent than themselves. It is as if when the world as they new it ended, they fought to hold on to their own innocence. This is repeated and honed as a well played metaphor in this story. Nicely original in many ways. Or at least originally presented.

Four waves out of five.

Should I read this? Yes, if you like sci-fi AND you like young adult fiction.
What did I learn? We protect in others what we lost in ourselves.

Needs and Wants

For one week in June, I did not buy anything unless I could without doubt say that I needed it. I didn't go without anything except my purchases made on a whim.

I always track my finances to make sure payments that hit my card are correct and that I'm on track for savings goals. What I do not do is look at what I bought and if that is valid... unless it is a big purchase and blew my usual spendings for the month.

At the end of June, I looked back and found that I spend around $365 less than my average month.

That is such a significant percentage drop and confirmed my inner revelation that I have become an American-like consumer. It actually needs to stop and finally, this is becoming apparent.

I have everything I want and it is as though I need ten of each thing. That is not a good way to think.

Changes, they are a-coming.

Monday, 20 June 2016


Book 17 of 2016 is Cinder by Marissa Meyer. This is the first book in the Lunar Chronicles.

I mostly cringe at fairytales - originals or those retold.

Unlike the massive fail that was Pride and Prejudice and Zombies as a mashup of genres, this sci-fi fairytale is a total win. Even the lovey dovey teenage rubbish doesn't dominate and is managed well by the female lead.

The plot was nowhere near as vacuous as the original and follows it very loosely. This was more like a modern teeny bopper sci-fi story than any fairytale.

Now to read the rest of the Lunar Chronicles.

Four kick-ass female mechanics out of five.

Should I read this? If you like old stories re-written well and with better female characters then you should.
What did I learn? Saving the world is much more important than falling in love.